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Lubec, Maine

A Border Town Shaped by the Sea

Lubec's 1911 Centennial Celebration

(Page 1 of 2) Print Version 

by Ronald Pesha, Lubec Historical Society

Lubec staged a grand celebration in 1911 observing the Town’s Centennial on July 3rd and 4th.
With a population peaking at nearly 3370 people and exuberant community pride, Lubec decorated itself as these views of on Water Street show.

Water Street decorated for Centennial, Lubec, 1911
Water Street decorated for Centennial, Lubec, 1911

Item Contributed by
Lubec Memorial Library
Centennial on Water Street, Lubec, 1911
Centennial on Water Street, Lubec, 1911

Item Contributed by
Lubec Historical Society

The actual “birthday” of Lubec is June 21, the date when the governor of Massachusetts (for Maine was part of that state until 1820) signed into law the Legislative Act on June 19th, 1811, which separated the new Town from Eastport.
Exactly 100 years later Lübeck, Germany sent a telegram. “On this eventful day commemorating the naming of Lubec, the city of the same name across the sea sends hearty congratulations. Signed, Senate of ther Hanse Town of Lübeck.” The weekly Lubec Herald newspaper reported the document one week later in its June 28th edition.
Decorations and Displays
By then the well-decorated Masons’ Washington Lodge #37 building, seen on the left below, was 56 years old. Chartered in 1822, the Lodge met in member Elijah Stearns’ Maine Hotel until 1839. The first building owned by the Lodge, erected in 1840, proved unsastisfactory and was replaced by this building in 1855 at a cost of $2,000. The prominent Mowry house seen here was moved away from Lubec during the latter half of the 20th Century.

Centennial on Main Street, Lubec, 1911
Centennial on Main Street, Lubec, 1911

Item Contributed by
Lubec Historical Society

The Weather and the Program
As a seaman and also Customs Collector, the personal diary of sardine mogul Jacob C. Pike contains daily weather commentary. Sunday July 2 "came in with a light breeze southwest and fine weather" and the same but cloudy skies prevailed on July 3. The published Program for the extensive two day anniversary lists athletic events, band concerts, ample public feeds, a “living flag” by Lubec’s children, and a celebratory townwide parade past splendidly decorated commercial and residential buildings, such as Jacob Pike's house at 2 Church street.